Trump to visit Kenosha despite objections of local officials :

President Donald Trump is slated to visit Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Tuesday, going against the wishes of officials requesting he stay away from the city, which is still coping from the recent shooting of an unarmed Black man by law enforcement and subsequent demonstrations that have turned deadly.

The President isn’t expected to meet with the family of Jacob Blake, the man was shot in the back seven times by a police officer. Trump claimed that he’s not meeting with Blake’s family during his Wisconsin visit because they wanted to involve lawyers.












According to Trump’s public schedule, the President is expected to begin his trip Tuesday afternoon with a visit to a “property affected by recent riots.” He’s then scheduled to visit a local high school and the city’s emergency operations center. Before departing Kenosha, he’ll participate in a roundtable focused on community safety.
Trump’s visit to the swing state is another attempt to continue his campaign of linking Democrat-run cities and states to violence ahead of the November election in an attempt to paint himself as voters’ candidate for law and order.
Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson tweeted that he will welcome the President in his home state. But other officials in the state have warned against the trip.
Wisconsin Democratic Gov. Tony Evers asked Trump to not visit Kenosha as the city works to heal and to prevent diverting local resources for a presidential visit.












And Kenosha Mayor John Antaramian, a Democrat, told 24newsreads.com’s Pamela Brown on “Erin Burnett OutFront” Monday that he is disappointed that the President is coming.
“Our community has gone through a great deal and there is no time right now for politics to be played. We would prefer the President had waited at least another week or so before coming to visit,” Antaramian said. “The President is always welcome. But at this time, it’s just the wrong time.”
The mayor offered little information about the details of the upcoming visit, but did say he does not expect to be part of discussions with Trump.
Jim Kreuser, the Kenosha County Executive, has echoed similar sentiments, and the Kenosha County Sheriff, David Beth, said a visit by any major figure will create extra work for the department.
Meanwhile, Joe Biden, the Democrats’ presidential nominee, has said he’s considering a visit to Wisconsin.












Biden’s advisers are discussing a possible visit as soon as this week, a source with knowledge of the discussions said, adding that the situation remains fluid.
Antaramian has said he also would like Biden to wait a week before visiting.
Refusing to condemn right-wing agitators
Trump in recent weeks has repeatedly pointed to at times violent demonstrations following incidents of police violence against Black people to claim that such unrest would be inflamed if Biden is elected.
He’s also largely ignored the anguish expressed nationwide by many Americans. On Monday, Trump said the demonstrations against police brutality seen across the country were not “peaceful protests,” but “anarchy.”
But Trump has not acknowledged whether his visit could embolden violence by right-wing vigilantes and agitators.












On Monday, he refused to denounce the violent actions by right-wing agitators at demonstrations in Portland and Wisconsin, including Kyle Rittenhouse, a 17-year-old vigilante who killed two protesters and injured another in Kenosha.
Trump said Rittenhouse “probably would have been killed” had he not fatally shot two protesters.
Asked if he agreed with armed vigilantes like Rittenhouse taking to the streets, Trump said he’d “like to see law enforcement take care of everything,” but didn’t condemn vigilantism.
He also argued that his supporters spraying a form of pepper spray and firing paintballs at protesters over the weekend were using them as “a defensive mechanism” when they rolled through the streets of Portland.
“They had large numbers of people that were supporters, but that was a peaceful protest,” Trump said in a response to a question from 24newsreads.com’s Kaitlan Collins, “and paint is not — and paint as a defensive mechanism. Paint is not bullets.”











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